Toward a Simple Life

If you ever wanted to live a simple life, try living on the prairie. The vast plain shows us we are but a small part of something larger. Here it is quiet and sublime, with a great canopy above and dark soil below. The prairie’s void draws you toward the earth, an invitation to root deeply into her embrace. My homage to living deliberately draws inspiration frost visiting autumn’s darkened fields. It has tiny hemp seeds in stone with acrylic, rust and earth pigments.

Thunder Head

Autumn storms are not the bombastic rains of summer with load noises and light, but something else. Mature, resigned and filled with a coolness that reminds us to be patient and faithful. This piece has layers of thick stone texture, iron oxidized to rust, acrylic and earth elements, including limestone, soil and plant ash.

Arrival of the Snow Geese

When the snow geese arrive at Fossil Lake, they descend in a great spiral, as if the breath of the north gently bore them toward earth. Snow Geese are said to be guardians of the North Wind and a teacher. For many weeks, I see them as they winter here, showing a beautiful sense of family, moving from the frozen pond to the warmth of the pasture grass and back again. When the icy wind arrives, they endure together with heads tucked into feathers, unmoving, quietly waiting for the cold to pass. Then when it does, they return to flight without dwelling on the storm. My rendition has iron oxidized to rust and acrylic with cuneiform-style marks cut in the hand-laid stone texture.

Winter Berries

… the winter is kind and leaves red berries on the boughs for the hungry sparrows … John Geddes

My homage to snow-covered berries that feed the winter birds is constructed with several layers of thick stone texture indented with organic grain and painted with acrylic and an organic rust glaze.

Dust and Shadow

The fading light reminds us that the divide between the worlds is shallow. My thoughts on impermanence hearken to Horace’s observation, “We are but dust and shadow.” This triptych is stone texture, grain, acrylic and layers of caramel-colored iron oxidized to rust to symbolize ephemerality.

Red Grass

I wanted to walk straight on through the red grass and over the edge of the world, which could not be very far away. The light and air abot me told me that the world ended here: only the ground and sun and sky were left, and if one went a little farther there would only be sun and sky, and one would float off into them, like the tawny hawks which sailed over our heads making slow shadows on the grass. Willa Cather, My Antonia

This field of red grass is made of hand-laid stone texture, acrylic and rust to remind you to be adventurous.